INVERTEBRATE BORINGS IN BONE

Coleopterian

Genus: Cubiculum ROBERTS, ROGERS, & FOREMAN, 2007
Etymology:

Species: levis PIRRONE, BUATOIS, RIGA, 2014
Etymology: Latin, levis, 'smooth, light, soft'.

Holotype: IANIGLA-Icn 1

Locality: Arroyo Seco, Mendoza Province, Argentina.

Horizon: Plottier Formation.

Biostratigraphy:

Age: Coniacian-Early Santonian stage, Lower Senonian substage, Middle Gulf Stage, Lower Late Cretaceous.

Material: Boring associated wiht a bone fagment of Dinosauria indet.

Referred material:

IANIGLA-PV 132: Associated to bone fragment of Dinosauria indet.

Beetle borings


Genus: Stratiotosuchus CAMPOS, SUAREZ, RIFF & KELLNER, 2001
Etymology: Greek, stratiotes, « solider, warrior » and Greek, suchos, the egyptian name for crocodile, the genus is masculine in gender.

Species: maxhechti CAMPOS, SUAREZ, RIFF & KELLNER, 2001
Etymology: In honr of Max K. Hecht, who has made great contributions to the field of vertebrate paleontology, particularly to the study of crocodylomorpha.
= Genus nova CAMPOS & SUAREZ, 1988/BERTINI, MARHALL, BAYET & BRITO, 1993

Holotype: DGM 1477-R

Locality: Irapuru, S 21°34’, W 51°21l, southern part of Sao Paulo State, Brazil.

Horizon: Bauru Formation, Adamantina Facies, Upper Bauru Group.

Biostratigraphy:

Age: Turonian Stage-Campanian Stage, Senonian Subepoch, Gulf Epoch, Late Cretaceous.

Material: Nearly complete skull and fragmentary skeleton.

Note: Pathologies are a right metatcarpal V and left metatarals I and II (CABRAL, RIFF, KELLNER & HENRIQUES, 2011).

Note: The left ulna has 2 boring marks, the right tibia has boring marks and the left tibia has a unique boring (CABRAL, RIFF, KELLNER & HENRIQUES, 2011).

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HASIOTIS, & FIORILLO, 1997. Several circular to ellipically-shaped borings in sauropod and theropod bones at Dinosaur National Monument.

Allosaurus MOR 693

Locality: 300 meters northeast of Howe Quarry, near Shell, Greybull, Big horn County, Wyoming.

Horizon: Salt Wash Member, Morrison Formation.

Biostratigraphy: Zone 2.

Age: Comobluffian age, Kimmeridgian Stage, uppermost Malm Epoch, Late Jurassic.

Material: Skull and skeleton approximately 90 percent complete, with pathologies on several phalanges.
Pathologies are as follows: Third dorsal vertebra. Right scapula, manus phalanx I-1, left ilium, metatarsal III, metatarsal V, pes phalanx III-1, two pes unguals and two dorsal ribs.

Note: “Big Al”, also shows beetle borings.

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Allosaurus AMNH 600

Locality: Bone Cabin Quarry, 8 miles north of Como, Medicine Bow Anticline (also called Flat top Anticline), Albany County, Wyoming.

Horizon: Salt Wash Member, Morrison Formation.

Biostratigraphy: Zone 2.

Age: Comobluffian age, Kimmeridgian Stage, uppermost Malm Epoch, Late Jurassic.

Material: Nearly complete skull.

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CHIN & BISHOP, 2007

Locality: San Rafael Swell, Emery County, Utah.

Horizon: Brushy Basin Member, Morrison Formation.

Biostratigraphy: Zone?

Age: Age?, Stage? uppermost Malm Epoch, Late Jurassic.

Material:

UCM 98012: Fragmentary theropod coprolite with bone fragments.

Note: With dermistid beetle borrings.

Number: Not given: 74 fragmentary coprolites, some with beetle borrings.

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KOLTE, GREEENHALBH, DANGERFIELD, SCHEETZ & BRITT

Invertebrate borings in dinosaur bones from the Cedar Mountain Formation, Dalton Wells Quarry, near Moab, Utah.

Possibly from Silphidae or Histeridae but non-coleopterian larvae cannot be ruled out.

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NORELL & MAKOVICKY, 1997, NORRELL & MAKOVICKY, 1999

Velicraptor referred specimen. IGM 100/985

IGM 100/985

Locality: Tögrögiin Shiree (= Tugrugeen Shireh, Tugrikin-Shireh locality), Ömnögov (South Gobi), Mongolia.

Horizon: Djadochta Formation.

Biostratigraphy:

Age: Middle Campanian Stage, Senonian Subepoch, Gulf Epoch, Late Cretaceous.

Material: Fragmentary specimen.
Note: Skeleton has insect borrings.

SANEYOSHI, WATABE, SUZUKI & TSOGTBAATAR, 2011

MPC-D 100/54: Fragmentary skeleton.

Note: With beetle borings on the skeleton.

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KIRKLAND, DELAGDO, CHIMEDSTSEREN & HASIOTIS, 1998

A Protoceratopsian showes insect boreings.

KIRKLAND, 1997, KIRKLAND & BADER, 2007

In situ: Fragmentary skull and skeleton with insect borings and pupae.

KIRKLAND & BADER, 2007, 2010

Number: Not given: Pinacosaurus skull and neck encased in diageneticaly enhanced burrows.

Number: Not given: Skull with insect boreings from "Andrew's Fortress".

In situ: Fox site Protoceratops (nearly complete skull and skeleton) with beetle borrings. Mass of pupal chambrs associated with jugal.

Theropod at the Mongolian Academy of Sciences with damge from borings.

Protoceratops foot with burrow backfilled with bone meal extending away from damaged wrist area.

SANEYOSHI, WATABE, SUZUKI & TSOGTBAATAR, 2011

MPC-D 100/533, /534: Fragmentary skulls and skeletons.

Note: With beetle borrings on the skull and skeletons.

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Bagaceratops sp

SANEYOSHI, WATABE, SUZUKI & TSOGTBAATAR, 2011

Locality: Hermiin Tsav (Khermeen Tsav ), western Ömnögov (South Gobi), Mongolia.

Horizon: Barun Goyot Formation.

Biostratigraphy:

Age:?Middle Campanian Stage, Senonian Subepoch, Gulf Epoch, Late Cretaceous.

Material:

MPD-D 100/535: Fragmentary skull and skeleton.

Note: Has beetle borings on the skeleton.

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BRITT, SCHEETZ & DANGERFIELD, 2008

Locality: Private land of Joe Gentry, about 15 km northeast of Medicine Bow, Carbon County, Wyoming.

Horizon: Equivalent to the Salt Wash Member, Morrison Formation.

Biostratigraphy: Zone 2.

Age: Comobluffian age, Kimmeridgian Stage, uppermost Malm Epoch, Late Jurassic.

Material:

BYU 17945: Fragmentary skeleton.

Note: Has many dermestid beetle traces on the bones.

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PAIK, 2000

Dinosaur incertae sedis?

Locality: Dapyeongri, Korea.

Horizon: Hasandong Formation.

Biostratigraphy:

Age: Early Cretaceous.

Material:

Number: Not given: Scapula with beetle borings and beetle burrows with bone chips.

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Camarasaurus

 

BADER, 2003, BADER, HASIOTIS & MARTIN, 2009

Locality: KU-WY-121, Black Hills, northeastern Wyoming.

Horizon: Member? Upper Morrison Formation.

Biostratigraphy: Zone?

Age: Age?, Stage?, Malm Epoch, Late Jurassic.

Material:

KUVP 129713: Fragmentary skeleton of an adult.

Note: Has shallow pits on the proximal sector of ribs, scapula and limb bones,has multiple rosetts were found on the left scapula and rib heads, has hemispherical pits on some bones, possible dermestid pupation chambers, has U to V-shaped linear grooves on the right manus possible from tooth marks of a theropod.

KUVP 129716: Partial articulated skeleton of an adult.

Note: Has shallow pits on the pubis and right femur, has single rosettes on the rib, has hemispherical pits on the centra of dorsal vertebrae and lateral surface of a sternal plate and rib head, has thin, curvillinear, branching grooves on rib head, possible dermestid pupation chambers, has U to V-shaped linear grooves on a grastralia rib, possible from tooth marks of a theropod..

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Brachiosauridae incertae sedis


BADER, 2003, BADER, HASIOTIS & MARTIN, 2009

Locality: KU-WY-121, Black Hills, northeastern Wyoming.

Horizon: Member? Upper Morrison Formation.

Biostratigraphy: Zone?

Age: Age?, Stage?, Malm Epoch, Late Jurassic.

Material:

KUVP 129724: 5 metatarsals of a left pes and 4 phalanges.

Note: Shallow pits from insects, possible dermestid pupation chambers.

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Diplodocidae incertae sedis

BADER, HASIOTIS & MARTIN, 2009

Locality: KU-WY-121, Black Hills, northeastern Wyoming.

Horizon: Member? Upper Morrison Formation.

Biostratigraphy: Zone?

Age: Age?, Stage?, Malm Epoch, Late Jurassic.

Material:

KUVP 129717: Pelvic girdle, anterior caudal vertebrae, right humerus, radius, ulna, femur, 2 dorsal vertebae, 3 cervical vertebrae and 4 ribs of a small individual.

Note: Has single rosettes on the scapula, possible dermestid pupation chambers.

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Ankylosaur incertae sedis

 

SANEYOSHI, WATABE, SUZUKI & TSOGTBAATAR, 2001

Locality: Tögrögiin Shiree (= Tugrugeen Shireh, Tugrikin-Shireh locality), 44°13’N, 103°16’E, Ömnögov (South Gobi), Mongolia.

Horizon: Djadochta Formation.

Biostratigraphy:

Age: Middle Campanian Stage, Senonian Subepoch, Gulf Epoch, Late Cretaceous.

Material:

MPC-D 100/1337: Fragmentary skull and fragmentary skeleton.

Note: With beetle borings on the skeleton.

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Ichnogenus: Cubiculum ROBERTS, ROGERS & FOREMAN, 2007
Etymology: Latin, cubiculum, chamber, bedroom; in reference to the inferred nature of the trace as an insect pupal chamber.

Ichnospecies: ornatus ROBERTS, ROGERS & FOREMAN, 2007
Etymology: Latin, ornatus, embellishment, ornament; refers to the bioglyph or surficial morphology present on the walls of the hollow ovoid.

Holotype: UA 9087

Locality: 15°54'9.5"S, 46°34'43.2"E, northewestern Madagascar.

Horizon: Anembalemba Member, Maevarano Formation.

Biostratigraphy:

Age: Late Cretaceous.

Material: Dozens of dinosaur bones have been collected containing this ichnofossil, up to 38 chambers have been observed in a single bone, and to date several hundred borings referable to C. ornatus have been documented in the Anembalemba Member from eight different localities.

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Ichnogenus: Osteocallis ROBERTS, ROGERS & FOREMAN, 2007
Etymology: Latin, osteo, 'bone', and Latin, callis, 'narrow track, footpath'.

Ichnospecies: mandibulus ROBERTS, ROGERS & FOREMAN, 2007
Etymology: French, mandibula, 'any of various invertebrate mouthparts serving to hold or bite food material'; refers to the interpreted creation of this trace by robust insect mandibles.

Ichnoholotype: UA 9088

Locality: 15°54'9.5"S, 46°34'43.2"E, northewestern Madagascar.

Horizon: Anembalemba Member, Maevarano Formation.

Biostratigraphy:

Age: Late Cretaceous.

Material: 4 fragmentary dinosaur bones have been collected from three different localities in the Maevarano Formation that exhibit this trace fossil, adn all contain numerous examples. At least 26 individuals trails occur on the holotype specimen.

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B

Bader, K, 2005, The use of forensic entomology in dinosaur taphonomy at a quarry in the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation in northeastern Wyoming: Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, v. 25, supplement to n. 3, abstracts of papers, sixty-fifth annual meeting, Society of Vertebrate Paleontology, Mesa Southwest Museum and Phoenix Marriott Mesa, Mesa, Arizona, October 19-22, 2005, p. 33a.

Bader, K., 2006, Recognition of insect traces on modern and fossil bones: Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, v. 26, supplement to n. 3, Sixty-sixth annual meeting, Society of Vertebrate Paleontology, Canadian Museum of Nature, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, October 18-21, p. 38a.

Bader, K. S., Hasiotis, S. T., and Matin, L. D., 2009, Application of forensic science techniques to trace fossils on dinosaur bones from a quarry in the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation, Northeastern Wyoming: Palaios, v. 24, p. 140-158.

Britt, B. B., Dangerfield, A., and Greenhalgh, B., 2005, Burrowed dinosaur bones: evidence of Cretaceous osteophagous beetles: Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, v. 25, supplement to n. 3, abstracts of papers, sixty-fifth annual meeting, Society of Vertebrate Paleontology, Mesa Southwest Museum and Phoenix Marriott Mesa, Mesa, Arizona, October 19-22, 2005, p. 39a.

Britt, B. B., Scheetz, R. D., and Dangerfield, A., 2008, A suite of dermestid beetle traces on dinosaur bone from the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation, Wyoming, USA: Ichnos, v. 15, p. 59-71.

C

Chin, K., and Bishop, J. R., 2007, Exploited twice: bored bone in a theropod coprolite from the Jurassic Morrison Formation of Utah, U.S.A.: Society for Sedimentary Geology, special publication, n. 88, p. 379-387.

Csiki, Z., Grigorescu, D., Codrea, V., and Therrien, F., 2010, Taphonomic modes in the Maastrichtian contental deposits of the Hateg basin, Romania - Palaeoecological and palaeobiological inferences: Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, v. 293, p. 375-390.

G

Getty, M. A., Loewen, M. A., Roberts, E. M., and Titus, A. L., 2009, Taphonomy of associated dinosaur remains from the Kaiparowits Formation, Grand Staircase-Escalane National Mounment, Utah : In: Advances in Western Interior Late Cretaceous Paleontology and Geology, in conjunction with the 8th conference on Fossil Resources Partners in Paleontology, Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, Cretaceous Symposium, p. 22.

H

Hasiotis, S. T., and Fiorillo, A. P., 1997, Demestid Beetle borings in Dinosaur BonesDinosaur National Monumnt, Utah: Additonal keyes to bone bed Taphonomy. The Geological Society of America 31st Annual South-Central 50th Annual Rocky Mountain, v. 29, n. 2, p. 13.

Hasiotis, S. T., Fiorillo, A. R., and Hanna, R. R., 1999, Preliminary report on borings in Jurassic dinosaur bones: evidence for invertebrate-vertebrate interactions: In: Vertebrate Paleontology in Utah, edited by Gillette D. D., Miscellaneous Publication 99-1, Utah Geological Survey, p. 193-200.

K

Kirkland, J. I., and Bader, K., 2007, Insect scavenging of a Protoceratops carcass preserved in the Upper Cretaceous Djadokhta Formation, Tugrikin Shireh, Mongolia: In: Ceratopsian Symposium, Short Papers, Abstracts, and Programs, complied by Braman, D. R., p. 83-89.

Kirkland, J. I., and Bader, K., 2010, Insect trce fossils associated with Protoceratops carcasses in the Djadokhta Formation (Upper Cretaceous), Mongolia: In: New Perspectives on Horned Dinosaurs. The Royal Tyrrell Museum Ceratopsian Symposium, edited by Ryan, M. J., Chinnery-Allgeier, B. J., and Eberth, D. A., Indiana University Press, Part Four, p. 509-519.

Kirkland, J. I., Delagdo, C. R., Chimedstseren, A., and Hasiotis, S. T., 1998, Insect? bored dinosaur skeletons and associated pupae from the Djadokhta Fm. (Cretaceous, Campanian), Mongolia: Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, v. 18, supplement to n. 3, Abstracts of papers. Fifty-eighth annual meeting, Society of Vertebrate Paleontology, Snowbird Ski and Summer Resort, Snowbird, Utah, September 30-October 3, p. 56a.

M

Martin, A. J., and Varricchio, D. J., 2010, Paleoecological utility of insect trace fossils in dinosaur nesting sites of the Two Medicine Formation (Campanian), Choteau, Montana: In Symposium on Dinosaur Eggs and Babies, Historical Biology, first article, 11pp.

Matsumoto, Y., 2000, A reconstruction of the stance of Protoceratops based on observation of the articulated skeletons: In: Abstracts of report meeting, Japan-Mongoli Joint Paleontological expedition, Mongolian Paleontological Center, Ulaan Bataar, Hayashibara Museum of Natural Sciences, Okayama, Results of the Hayashibara Museum of Natural Sciences, Mongolian Academy of Sciences, Mongolian Paleontological Center, Joint Paleontological Expedition, n. 1, Hayashibara Museum of Natural Sciences, Research Bulletin, v. 1, p. 134.

N

Nolte, M. J., Grteenhalgh, B. W,. Dangerfield, A., Scheetz, R. D, and Britt, B. B., 2004, Invertebrate burrows on dinosaur bones from the Lower Cretaceous Cedar Mountain Formation near Moab, Utah, USA: In: The Geological Society of America, Geoscience in a changing world, annual meeting & exposition, abstracts with programs, v. 36, n. 3, p. 379.

Norell, M. A., and Makovicky, P. J., 1997, Important features of the Dromaeosaur skeleton: information from a new specimen: American Museum Novitates, n. 3215, p. 1-17.

Norell, M. A., and Makovicky, P. J., 1999, Important Features of the Dromaeosaurid Skeleton II: Information from Newly Collected Specimens of Velocirpator mongoliensis: American Museum Novitates, n. 3282, p. 1-45.

P

Paik, I. S., 2000, Bone chip-filled burrows associated with bored dinosaur bone in floodplain paleosols of the Cretaceous Hasandong Formation, Korea: Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, v. 157, p. 213-225.

Pirrone, C. A., Buatois, L. A., and Riga, B. G., 2014, A new ichnospecies of Cubiculum from Upper Cretaceous Dinosaur bones in western Argentina: Ichnos, v. 21, p. 251-260.

R

Roberts, E. M., 1997, Insect modification of Dinosaur bones from the Upper Cretaceous of Madagascar: Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, v. 17, supplement to n. 3, Abstracts of Papers, Fifty-seventh Annual Meeting Society of Vertebrate Paleontology, Field Museum, Chicago, Illinois, October 8-11, p. 71a.

Roberts, E. M., Rogers, R. R., and Foreman, B. Z., 2007, Continental insect borings in dinosaur bone: examples from the Late Cretaceous of Madagascar and Utah: Journal of Paleontology, v. 81, n. 1, p. 201-208.

Rogers, R. R., and Krause, D. W., 2007, Tracking an ancient killer: Scientific American, v., 296, n. 2, p. 42-47, 50-51.

S

Saneyoshi, M., Watabe, M., Suzuki, S., and Tsogtbaatar, K., 2011, Trace fossils on dinosaur bones from Upper Cretaceous eolian deposits in Mongolia: Taphonomic interpretation of paleoecosystems in ancient desert environments: Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, v. 311, p. 38-47.

Sertich, J., Sampson, S., Lowen, M,. Gathogo, P., Brown, F., and Manthi, F. K., 2005, Dinosaurs of Kenya’s Rift: fossil preservatioin in the Lubur Sandstone of Northern Kenya: Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, v. 25, supplement to n. 3, abstracts of papers, sixty-fifth annual meeting, Society of Vertebrate Paleontology, Mesa Southwest Museum and Phoenix Marriott Mesa, Mesa, Arizona, October 19-22, 2005, p. 114a.

W

Webster, D., 1999, A Dinosaur named SUE: National Geographic, v. 195, n. 6, p. 46-59.

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Bivalve Borings

Tapanila, L., Roberts, E. M., Bouare, M. L., Sissoko, F., and O'Leary, M. A., 2004, Bivalve borings in phosphatic coprolites and bone, Cretaceous-Paleogene, northeastern Mali: Palaios, v. 19, p. 565-573.